2007 was a diverse year in northwest Arkansas. While many were thankful for bounty and great growing seasons, others were staring at the sky, hoping for even a bit of rain.  I guess it’s like the saying goes, “If you don’t like the weather, stick around a day or two, it’ll change.” I’d say it could also be said here in the Ozarks, “If you don’t like the weather, drive 50 miles, and it’ll change.”
But it is not for similarity in weather, but rather similarity in spirit that keeps us Ozarks farmers and ranchers in one accord. It is the determination to keep going even when the weather is bad, and the insight to still prepare for the worst, even when the weather is good.
There are many forecasts for the agriculture economy in 2008. Two of Arkansas’ agriculture experts gave their evaluation on the predictions for ‘08 on page 22.
But me personally, I have decided that it isn’t weather, prices or even politics that will determine the future of Arkansas agriculture. Instead, it’s the resilience of the people, the farmers, to stay strong against change: political, economical or environmental. To keep educating ourselves and preparing for the worst, while hoping for the best… to learn from each other, and from the experts provided by the great University Extension program, and other industry experts.
Farming isn’t always easy. It’s not always profitable. But yet we stick with it every day, rain or shine, sickness or health… and that, I think, is what keeps the industry thriving.
God bless you in 2008,

Melissa FullerEditorial / OpinionsArkansas2007 was a diverse year in northwest Arkansas. While many were thankful for bounty and great growing seasons, others were staring at the sky, hoping for even a bit of rain.  I guess it’s like the saying goes, “If you don’t like the weather, stick around a day or...The Ozarks' most read farm newspaper, reaching more than 58,000 readers in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma