Name:  Beverly Chevallier

In Town:  Beverly has been a vet for 25 years. She has a mixed animal vet clinic in Western Grove, Ark. She has owned a 24-hour fitness center next door to the vet clinic for nine years. Beverly teaches karate four nights a week, and is a black belt in karate herself.

In the Country:  Beverly moved back to Searcy County to help with the family farm. She is still running cows and Katahdin sheep on what was once her grandpa’s land. Beverly explained she built the clinic so she could raise her four kids at the clinic.

Family:  Beverly’s children are sons, Jake and his wife, Sarah Beth, Clancy and his wife, Melissa, and daughters, Rachel and Eva.

How has your work complemented farming?
“I was raised on a farm. I live in the very same spot I lived in high school – different house, same spot. And my sister lives down the holler in our grandma’s old house, but anybody that farms has to do it because they like it,” Beverly said. Being able to use her veterinary medicine knowledge on her own farm has helped her over the years as well.”

What are the challenges running a vet clinic?
“The business side of it. I have no business sense. All vets love their work but most just aren’t business people. But, God has always taken care of me. I basically have no challenges now, though. Raising four kids out here – that was challenging, now, they’re all raised, it’s a piece of cake. I love what I do. I get to play every day, and I have a great life.”

What is the best piece of advice you'd share with another farmer?
“Consult your local vet, don’t listen to the coffee shop talk for scientific information. My advice is free, just ask.”
By OFN Staff

Melissa FullerArkansas / Oklahoma Town & CountryArkansasName:  Beverly Chevallier In Town:  Beverly has been a vet for 25 years. She has a mixed animal vet clinic in Western Grove, Ark. She has owned a 24-hour fitness center next door to the vet clinic for nine years. Beverly teaches karate four nights a week, and is...The Ozarks' most read farm newspaper, reaching more than 58,000 readers in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma