And so time passes with the speed of light. Our so-recent “New Year” has passed the half-way mark and is headed for the end of the year with, if not the speed of light, a speed that each day finds us incapable of keeping up with the changes we will see tomorrow.
With that daunting introduction, let us tackle what surely must be on the minds of every thinking citizen:  how can our beloved nation survive the economic chaos with which we find ourselves?
And can we? And if we can, how? And if we do not, what lies ahead?
First let me suggest that we can and will survive, but not without a lot pain. And not by the method or methods we are using today.
You cannot put out fire with more fire. You must locate the source of the fire.
You cannot erase debt by compounding more debt. That has been tried before without success. The usual result is war, changing of “the guard,” and more war.
Many years back I interviewed with one of the most astute persons ever produced in the Ozarks. His name was Dewey Short, 7th district Congressman. He related experiences with money and debt while in Germany before the first World War when massive debt and inflation gave way to Adolph Hitler and World War I.
At the time of the interview I was so impressed with his words of wisdom that I saved the story and the interview. What prompted me to do so I have not the slightest idea at that time, but I guess it was for this moment alone, for I think the words of this home-grown Ozarks Congressman was a God send for those of us who care about our nation and the conditions of this day. His words should have a powerful effect on the present day and our children.
I quote Dewey Short:  “During the final stages of German inflation, it took over five billion German marks to buy one American dollar. I could get a seven-course dinner for about 15 cents and the best seat in the opera house for about three cents. My room in the best hotel for a month cost me less than ten dollars. And that was the beginning of the inflation, eight years before the collapse.
But the poor Germans could not buy a loaf of bread with a wheelbarrow full of marks.
The collapse of the German economy, of course, brought about Hitler and the course of worldly affairs were forever changed."
The question of the moment, to me, is this – can it happen in the United States?
I am not an economist. I am not even a college graduate. I am just an old country boy who learned to “whittle out behind the barn.”
And what I see that is going on today is heading the U.S. right down the path to hyper inflation as never before in the United States' history.
The borrowing of billions and billions of dollars from the Federal Reserve Bank, which must now be paid back – if ever indeed they can be paid back, will have to be paid by U.S. citizens. In truth, it can never be paid back. It will compound year after year until our beloved USA is hopelessly in debt and our dollar will be worth no more than a penny.
What was the alternative of the USA to the economic catastrophe that brought on this year’s billions in borrowed money to the Wall Street gamblers?
The alternative would let the amblers eat their own ill-gotten losses. Instead, Congress did the very worst thing ever – borrowed money from the Federal Reserve banks – which are “federal” only in name alone and not any part of the United States government, contrary to the knowledge of most people.
But billions and billions of dollars donated to bail out the gamblers will have to be paid back by U.S. citizens.
America, America, God shed his grace on thee…
He shed very few brains on the members of congress who voted to bail out a handful of gamblers who have for generations been robbing hard-working citizens of their rightful wages.
Surely He thought we should have had brains enough to do the right things when the occasion presented itself.

Melissa FullerEditorial / OpinionsMissouriAnd so time passes with the speed of light. Our so-recent “New Year” has passed the half-way mark and is headed for the end of the year with, if not the speed of light, a speed that each day finds us incapable of keeping up with the changes we...The Ozarks' most read farm newspaper, reaching more than 58,000 readers in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma