ES Construction

Owner:  Eldon Swartzentruber

Company History:  Eldon started doing construction when he was 16 years old. He was doing his own contracting at 19. A member of the Mennonite community, Eldon worked early on in the feed mills for his brother’s company before it sold, and also ran dairy cows in the early 90s before deciding to open a construction company. “In 1998 after the dairy sale, my brother loaned me his big Ford van, and I put tools in the back."
ES Construction today is a family operation, with crews of Eldon’s older son, his family and community members doing construction and restoration work within 100 miles of Buffalo, Mo. “We are thankful that God has blessed us this much, and also, we owe thanks to our customers,” Eldon said.  

Services:  “We do contract building and remodeling projects of all sizes,” Eldon said. ES Construction will take any kind of construction work, interior, exterior, excavating, cleanup, remodeling, restoring.
Eldon said he has been satisfied with the addition of a boom lift to his work equipment. “This (boom lift) to me, is like a big farmer having a big cab tractor with four-wheel drive. This has really helped build our barn business.”

At what point should a farmer consider tearing down a barn instead of restoring it?
“If a barn has been in the family for years people usually want to restore it. If the building is not sentimental and the price to restore it is up to three-quarters that of the price of a new barn, I’d recommend they tear it down and start new. We will do total restoration though, tighten tin down, or change all the tin out, take out a rotted structure and replace it with new, jack up and support old foundations. We'll answer any questions a farmer has and try to help make the best decision."
By OFN Staff

Melissa FullerMissouri AgribusinessMissouriES ConstructionOwner:  Eldon SwartzentruberCompany History:  Eldon started doing construction when he was 16 years old. He was doing his own contracting at 19. A member of the Mennonite community, Eldon worked early on in the feed mills for his brother’s company before it sold, and also ran dairy cows...The Ozarks' most read farm newspaper, reaching more than 58,000 readers in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma