The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry (ODAFF) announced several rule changes affecting transport of feral swine in Oklahoma that will take effect November 1. Changes have been made in the way feral swine can be tracked by hunters and sold at markets. A further change restricts the importation of feral swine.

“The most import message is that feral swine can no longer be sold at livestock markets and can only be imported for slaughter after November 1,” ODAFF Staff Veterinarian Justin Roach said.

When the changes take place, hunters may use a tracking method called the “Judas pig” tagging system. This is a population control technique where a radio-collared feral swine is released into a control area and, after allowing a sufficient period for the animal to join other feral swine, it is tracked down and all swine found with the swine wearing the collar are removed.

The amended Feral Swine Control Act also prohibits importing feral swine for any reason except sending them to a slaughter facility in a sealed trailer. A permit from the U.S. Department of Agriculture must accompany the animals to the slaughter facility.

Livestock markets have been removed from the list of facilities where feral swine may be sold. Live feral swine may only be sold to licensed handling facilities, licensed sporting facilities, and slaughter facilities.

For more information about feral swine regulations and the Feral Swine Control Act, go to http://www.oda.state.ok.us/ais/feralswine.htm or contact Dr. Roach at (405) 522-8396 or justin.roach@ag.ok.gov.

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