Age: 12

Parents: Len and Hasnaini Wood

Hometown: Summit, Ark

4-H Club: Marion County 4-H

Leader: Brian See

What is your 4-H project and what you like about it?

“I raise broilers and laying hens. I get to keep track of the feed costs, the types of feed and I weigh the birds before showing. I am also a member of the 4-H shooting team and training for competition.”

How did you get started with 4-H?

“My mom made me go, and I didn’t want to at first. Then I changed my mind when I started shooting sports and raising poultry.”

What do you like about showing, competing?

“I like competing, I won blue ribbons for my pullets and broilers, they both were in the first class which is the class for the best birds. Two years ago, I got sixth at my first 4-H State Barbecue Contest. I put on a rub and made my own sweet-and-sour sauce. That was really fun.”

What do you do to help out on the farm?

“I feed and water the chickens and sometimes the goats, sheep and cattle. That keeps me pretty busy. My favorite sheep is named Alpaca because he looks and acts like one.”

What is your favorite part about living in the country?

“I like the quiet and the fact that no people are around, so I can make as much noise as I want.”

What are your future plans?

“My dad is a computer programmer and also taught me about our animals. When I grow up I want to be in computers like my dad but I want to be a game programmer so I can make games I like. I think if I like them, other people will too.”

http://www.ozarksfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Wood-1024x736.jpghttp://www.ozarksfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Wood-150x150.jpgTerry RoppArkansas / Oklahoma YouthYouth in Agriculture4-h,Arkansas,Ash Wood,Marion County,summit,woodAge: 12 Parents: Len and Hasnaini Wood Hometown: Summit, Ark 4-H Club: Marion County 4-H Leader: Brian SeeWhat is your 4-H project and what you like about it? “I raise broilers and laying hens. I get to keep track of the feed costs, the types of feed and I weigh the birds before...The Ozarks' most read farm newspaper, reaching more than 58,000 readers in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma