Location: Siloam Springs, Ark.

Instructors: Jarred Wyatt, Shea Gregory, Glenn Walker and Kendra Woodlee

Pictured: Jarred Wyatt

In the Classroom: “In our high school, there are two separate departments and I work half-time in ag and half-time in industrial maintenance,” Jarred Wyatt said. “The industrial side offers HVAC, robotics, welding and machining, and in ag I teach structures, metals, small gas engines and electricity. I am also the advisor for the forestry and land team in FFA, as well as helping with everything else. During the summer, I visit students at their  farms, weighing and tagging animals in preparation for the fair plus getting ready for the upcoming year which includes preparing my classroom and work areas. The advantage of a four-person department is everyone helps but works in a niche that plays to individual strengths. An example of what I will be doing in the classroom/work room is teaching students the difference between four- and two-cycle engines and having students work with lawn mower and weed eater engines usually donated by Lowe’s. Students will label parts, explain what each does, troubleshoot and figure out how to repair. The purpose of the machines program is to allow students an opportunity to be comfortable working with their hands so they can be successful in real-world jobs. I am lucky enough to have an excellent facility. Ours is the biggest program on campus with more than 500 students and receives active alumni support, which has allowed us to stay up to date in terms of curriculum.”

Philosophy and future: “Siloam Springs has a rural background but most students live in town so the number of students involved in showing animals is only 16.  One plan for the future is to expand the number of students showing animals, perhaps through partnership with local farmers. This might mean allowing a student to keep an animal on a farm in exchange for work. We are also offering a new class in animal and veterinary science in an effort to open their understanding of agriculture beyond technology and the chickens that are so predominant here. Raising animals teaches a different kind of responsibility as well as broadening their understanding of agriculture. A long-term extension of our goal to increase showing participation is the possible construction of a barn on campus for students to use.”

http://www.ozarksfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Wyatt-1024x649.jpghttp://www.ozarksfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Wyatt-150x150.jpgTerry RoppArkansas / Oklahoma AgribusinessEye on AgribusinessAgriculture department,Arkansas,high school,Jarred Wyatt,Siloam SpringsLocation: Siloam Springs, Ark. Instructors: Jarred Wyatt, Shea Gregory, Glenn Walker and Kendra Woodlee Pictured: Jarred Wyatt In the Classroom: “In our high school, there are two separate departments and I work half-time in ag and half-time in industrial maintenance,” Jarred Wyatt said. “The industrial side offers HVAC, robotics, welding and...The Ozarks' most read farm newspaper, reaching more than 58,000 readers in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma